20 October 2006

A quarter of chaos for IE7

It seems that IE7’s rollout will be gradual & random, to give time “to set companywide policies for browser deployment and possibly recode any intranet sites that are not compatible with the new version of the browser”.

Well, so much for “support” of Internet standards, if IE can’t even be compatible with IE, let alone everything else.

Also, the rollout will take 3 months, “automatic” updates will prompt users before following through, and the recipients will be chosen randomly; “it will be a phased rollout” and the speed will be determined by the number of support calls seen...

So... we have an update that breaks existing policies & sites, happening at random & in ways which are inconsistent with expected behaviour — and this is supposed to help smooth things out?

And... “even those who have configured Automatic Updates to install software automatically will be asked after the download is complete whether to install the new browser” so be expecting random support calls from confused users & expect several from each user.

Why?

Because MS unilaterally decided to break update policies across the world.

Why?

So their support centres are appropriately staffed at the time.

However, their overt justification is that it’s for the customers’ own good.

Updates arriving at random times of three months, plus or minus. Reliable? Sound familiar?

I can see a strengthening case for Firefox here, along with a deliberate update policy erasing MSIE from the target systems.

This won’t stop public websites from being broken for IE7, but it will cut down on those first-thing-in-the-morning panic-stricken support calls.

...oh, the next time someone rants on at me about Open Source & consistency, they’re going to find themselves laughed at,

2 comments:

Leon Brooks said...

Here's a portentious quote from another article touching MSIE7 & Firefox:

But few businesses are expected to deploy the browser upgrade until they install Vista, Microsoft’s major Windows upgrade that’s set for release to businesses in November.

The reason for the delay is IE’s tight integration with the operating system. Installing IE 7 on a Windows XP machine in an office would require a lot of testing first to determine the impact on business applications. Rather than test twice, companies are more likely to stick with IE6 until Vista

This is also pointing toward months of anarchy as the releases trickle out.

Leon Brooks said...

Re-quoting the above, no italics:

But few businesses are expected to deploy the browser upgrade until they install Vista, Microsoft’s major Windows upgrade that’s set for release to businesses in November.

The reason for the delay is IE’s tight integration with the operating system. Installing IE 7 on a Windows XP machine in an office would require a lot of testing first to determine the impact on business applications. Rather than test twice, companies are more likely to stick with IE6 until Vista.