02 May 2006

Monochromically inverse team

I noted a “team” of nurses today at RPRH who are quite distinctive. One is Mauritian and the other born here in Perth. Other than being RPRH nurses, both femmes, similar sizes and both with a good command of English, they have very few physical commonalities. Their skins are (wonderfully) different. The Perthite is blonde-ish-haired and blue-ish-eyed (basically light Caucasian), the Mauritian is dark-haired and large-brown-eyed (basically fine-boned African), and so on.

...but...

When they wander about doing nurselike routines, these two walk in stride, they wear a fundamentally similar expression, they react to the same sights and sounds in (to state it lightly) similar ways, they each start conversations based around the same points of interest, and so on.

An impressive basic observation is that despite the obvious commonalities of behaviour, dedication to good work, politeness, echo reactions and so on, they are each quite different people at heart, both working excellently and not as “mere” mutual clones.

3 comments:

Lindsay Holmwood said...

Making conversation and smalltalk with patients and their families is something all new nurses are assesed on during their first year of training. :-)

Leon Brooks said...

Thanks, Lindsay, that’s something which I (obviously, as a patient) have never been told by any staff, or ever seem in real, effective practice outside RPH or RPRH (anywhere in WA or NZ).

Leon Brooks said...

M[ir][s]s Perth from the team seems to occasionally develop another (BOC more overlap, optically) Caucason team-mate instead.

To my delight, the resulting team has a similar and effective plurality of action. This combination is little faster, which undermines a little of the original smoothness-of-action but entails more eye-keeping motility (walking, looking, talking) in its place.

It was quite disconcerting on my first sight to see “half” of the team and then someone else that my blinky/worn/beaten little brain mis-identified as being “the same half” of the team in a different spot at the same time.

As is so for all else that I remember to this date, those worn neurons seem to have generally rattled around and organised the mono/chromatic novelty so that I can understand and appreciate either team in action without massive disorientation. This effect is occupying and reassuring, both for the internal autocorrection itself and for then clearly seeing the soothing check-on-check duality from both teams as they occur.